Skip to Content

Sean Turnell

x

Contact Staff

Photo of Sean Turnell
  • Title: Associate Professor
  • Position: Associate Professor - Department of Economics
  • Qualifications: BEc Macq. PhD Macq.

Contact Details

Areas of Expertise

  • Expert on Burma, the use of economic sanctions. Has advised the US Congress on the Burma situation
  • Australian Banks in Asia

Profile

A former Senior Analyst at the Reserve Bank of Australia, Sean Turnell joined the Economics Department in 1991.

His research interests include:

  • Burma and its economy,
  • financial sector reform in developing countries,
  • the history of global monetary institutions, and
  • the history of Australian economic thought.

Sean Turnell has published in numerous international journals on these and other topics, including:

  • ASEAN Economic Bulletin,
  • Asian-Pacific Economic Literature, 
  • Asian Studies Review,
  • Asian Survey,
  • Australian Economic History Review, 
  • Bijdragen tot de Taal,
  • Land-en Volkenkunde, 
  • Economic and Labour Relations Review,
  • Economic and Political Weekly,
  • the Economic Record,
  • Asian Economic Policy Review,
  • History of Economics Review, and
  • the Journal of Economic History.
His work has been cited by media all around the world, including:
  • the Wall Street Journal,
  • Financial Times,
  • The Economist, 
  • New York Times,
  • Washington Post,
  • The Guardian,
  • The Times,
  • Australian Financial Review,
  • The Australian
  • and many others.
He has made many appearances in the electronic media, including:
  • the BBC,
  • ABC,
  • SBS,
  • Bloomberg Television,
  • CNN,
  • Al-Jazeera,
  • Sky-News and
  • the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.

Sean Turnell’s book examining the history of Burma’s monetary and financial system, Fiery Dragons: Banks, Moneylenders and Microfinance in Burma was published (2009) by the Nordic Institute of Asian Studies (NIAS) Press.

Sean Turnell's Ph.D thesis examined the efforts of Australian economists to reform the architecture of the global economy during the first half of the twentieth century. Download a copy of the thesis, Monetary Reformers, Amateur Idealists and Keynesian Crusaders: Australian Economists’ International Advocacy, 1925-1950.

Sean Turnell is a member of the editorial board of the History of Economics Review, Burma Economic Watch and the Macquarie Economics Research Papers. He is a member of the History of Economic Thought Society of Australia, the Economic Society of Australia, and the Asian Studies Associations of the United States and of Australia.

Much of Sean Turnell's work has been concerned with the poltical economy and economic history of Burma. With Alison Vicary and Wylie Bradford, in 2001 he established Burma Economic Watch, an on-line resource of information and commentary on Burma's economy.

Sean Turnell was a Visiting Scholar to the Faculty of Economics and Politics, University of Cambridge in 2000, and a Visiting Fellow to the Southeast Asia Program, Cornell University, in 2006, and to the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University, in 2008.

In 2006 and 2009, Sean Turnell was invited to testify on Burma to US Senate and House of Representatives Committees on Foreign Relations and Human Rights.

Research grants

With colleagues Alison Vicary, Wylie Bradford and Joseph Macri, Sean Turnell is currently the recipient of a Macquarie University Research Development Grant to conduct a survey of Burmese migrant workers and refugees in Thailand.

Current projects

ARC (2007-2009) – Understanding Burma's Health Crisis and its Challenge to Regional Security

Research areas

  • Burma and its economy
  • Financial sector reform in developing countries
  • History of global monetary institutions
  • History of Australian economic thought
  • Australia's interaction with the global trading and monetary system
  • The role of currency boards in transition and emerging market economies

publications toggle icon open Industry Publications

Macquarie Economics Research Papers

Professional Membership

  • Member of: History of Economic Thought Society of Australia, Australia
  • Member of: Economic Society of Australia, Australia
  • Member of: Asian Studies Association of Australia, Australia
  • Member of the Faculty Board of: the Faculty of Business and Economics, Macquarie Universtiy Australia

phd supervision toggle icon open PhD Student Supervision

  • Associate Supervisor of Mohammod Lutful Kabir - PhD-Economics Research - Full Time
  • Principal Supervisor of Paul Adjei Onyina - PhD-Economics Research - Full Time

Media Mentions

  • Photo relating to Associate Professor Sean Turnell was quoted in The IrrawaddyAssociate Professor Sean Turnell was quoted in The Irrawaddy

  • Commentary from Associate Professor Sean Turnell on Burma's new role as Asean chair in The Irrawaddy online.

    Publication: The Irrawaddy
    Title: Will the Asean Chair Strain Burma’s Resources?
    Date: 9 January, 2014

    Excerpt:

    “Managing the [Asean] chairmanship will impose extra burdens upon a narrow cohort of able people who are managing the reform process, but who are already grossly overworked. To this extent, the chairmanship could be an unwelcome distraction,” economist and Burma expert Sean Turnell told The Irrawaddy while visiting Rangoon.

    “On the other hand, the country is receiving assistance in the role from prior chair countries, which is likely to be helpful both for the matter at hand, and perhaps more broadly in terms of public administration.”

    View the article here

  • Photo relating to Associate Professor Sean Turnell was quoted in an article in the Straits TimesAssociate Professor Sean Turnell was quoted in an article in the Straits Times

  • Publication: Asia One
    Title: Death knell for Thailand's Dawei project?
    Date: 21 November, 2013

    Associate Professor Sean Turnell was quoted in an article in the Straits Times, talking about the future of Thailand's Dawei project: Death knell for Thailand's Dawei project?

    Excerpt: Professor Sean Turnell of Australia's Macquarie University, a specialist on Myanmar's economy, wrote in an e-mail: "The Dawei project is a dead man walking."

    "No one except the Thai government really wants it."

    He added that it offered little more than rent payments to Myanmar. "These were of interest to Myanmar's old rent-seeking military regime, but are not so attractive to a government trying to deliver real transformational growth and employment."

    Read the full article

  • Photo relating to Associate Professor Sean Turnell provided comment to the Myanmar TimesAssociate Professor Sean Turnell provided comment to the Myanmar Times

  • Publication: Myanmar Times
    Title: World Bank revises GDP growth to 6.8%
    Date: 13 October, 2013
    Author: Philip Heijmans and Aye Thidar Kyaw

    Excerpt: Sean Turnell, an expert in Myanmar’s economy at Australia’s Macquarie University, said the current inflation undermines the nation’s competitiveness as the misallocation of resources through arbitrary changes in price relativities put a dent in the real purchasing power of money, especially among those on fixed or low-wage incomes.

    “The World Bank report sounds plausible in terms of a representative basket of consumer goods,” he said by email. “Prices in other areas, especially with respect to real estate, have risen much faster and higher of course,” he said.

    On the other hand, the current US dollar exchange rate of K970 seems an “appropriate ballpark” that is not too low to invite inflation.

    “It gives a boost to the competitiveness of Myanmar’s exports and import substitutes, while at the same time making the country a more attractive location for foreign investment,” he said.

    For the moment there is probably not a lot the central bank could do about surging property prices, he said.

    Read the full article

  • Photo relating to Sean Turnell was mentioned in the Myanmar Times article Sean Turnell was mentioned in the Myanmar Times article "Micro lenders eye growth paths"

  • Publication: Myanmar Times
    Title: Micro lenders eye growth paths
    Date: 29 September, 2013
    Author: Jeremy Mullins

    Excerpt: Sean Turnell, an economics professor at Macquarie University, said prudential regulations are necessary for the microfinance sector and the financial industry as a whole, adding the trick is to get the balance right between regulation that discourages imprudent lending and excessive indebtedness this creates, while not restricting the sector’s capabilities.

    “Such a balance is especially difficult to arrive at in Myanmar at this time, since there has been something of a ‘rush’ of microfinance firms,” he said.“

    Historically, and in other countries, dramatic expansions of microfinance have fueled ‘boom and bust’ episodes that have been greatly destructive of confidence.”

    Mr Turnell also said he is “sanguine about the entry of foreign MFIs, and [worries] more about local moneylending operators and the like taking up MFI licences.”

    Read the full article

  • Photo relating to Associate Professor Sean Turnell contributes to the article Associate Professor Sean Turnell contributes to the article "Myanmar's new old friend" in the Bangkok Post

  • Publication: Bangkok Post
    Title: Myanmar’s new old friend
    Date: 23 September, 2013
    Author: Joseph Schatz

    Excerpt: Japan has been “by far the most vigorous of the countries ‘engaging’ Myanmar since the arrival of [Myanmar president] Thein Sein”, says Sean Turnell, a Myanmar expert and economics professor at Australia’s Macquarie University.

    “Japan certainly perceives a special relationship — a mixture of contemporary strategic and aid policies as well as historical sentiment,” says Macquarie University’s Turnell. The sentiment, he said, “relates to a widespread notion in Japan that the country acted as something of a midwife to Myanmar’s independence in light of its (temporary) ending of British rule in the Second World War”.

    Read the full article

  • Photo relating to Sean Turnell comments to Asia Times about the Myanmar economySean Turnell comments to Asia Times about the Myanmar economy

  • Professor Sean Turnell spoke to Asia Times Online about Myanmar's currency, and the current issues around imperfections in bills.

    Publication: Asia Times Online
    Title: Clean bills or bust in Myanmar
    Date: 3 July, 2013

    Excerpt:

    Sean Turnell, an economics professor at Macquarie University in Sydney and an expert on the Myanmar economy, confronted the discerning monetary situation when on a recent trip to the country he tried to settle the bill at his hotel.

    "The serial number of the bill was CB and the belief was, even though this sounds so absurd, the belief was that CB stood for counterfeit bill," Turnell said. "I explained to the young girl behind the counter in one of the top hotels and I said well if it were a counterfeit bill it wouldn't have CB on it. She completely agreed and at one point said 'We really have to get over this'."

    Read the full article "Myanmar's Demand For Pristine Dollar Notes, Following A History Of Monetary Instability, Borders On The Absurd"

  • Photo relating to Sean Turnell advises on Myanmar's currencySean Turnell advises on Myanmar's currency

  • Professor Sean Turnell spoke to International Business Times about Myanmar's currency, and the current issues around imperfections in bills.

    Publication: International Business Times
    Title: Myanmar's Demand For Pristine Dollar Notes, Following A History Of Monetary Instability, Borders On The Absurd
    Date: 4 July, 2013

    Excerpt:

    "The serial number of the bill was CB and the belief was -- even though this sounds so absurd -- that CB stood for counterfeit bill," ... Turnell encountered the situation on a recent trip to the country. "I explained to the young girl behind the counter in one of the top hotels and I said well if it were a counterfeit bill it wouldn't have CB on it. She completely agreed and at one point said 'We really have to get over this'."

    Read the full article "Myanmar's Demand For Pristine Dollar Notes, Following A History Of Monetary Instability, Borders On The Absurd"

  • Photo relating to Trade in Myanmar - Sean TurnellTrade in Myanmar - Sean Turnell
  • Associate Professor Sean Turnell spoke to the Bangkok Post about trade and Myanmar.

    Publication: Bangkok Post
    Title: Pipelines to make Myanmar trade hub
    Date: 27 May 2013

    Excerpt: "Burma (Myanmar) is now the world's second-largest producer of pulses and beans, and most of it is exported to India," Turnell said. "The port could open the door to other commodities."

    Read the full article "Pipelines to make Myanmar trade hub".

  • Photo relating to Myanmar Abolishes Dollar Surrogate - IPOT NewsMyanmar Abolishes Dollar Surrogate - IPOT News
  • Sean Turnell was quoted regarding Myanmar's economic situation in an article for IPOT News.

    Publication: IPOT News
    Title: Myanmar Abolishes Dollar Surrogate
    Date: 20 March 2013
    Author: Kirim Komentar

    Excerpt: "Sean Turnell, a Myanmar economic expert at Australia's Macquarie University, said the announcement could be a new test of public confidence in the government's handling of the economy.

    "In the past movements like this have caused panics, but perhaps there is greater trust in monetary arrangements now," he said, adding that those holding FECs would rush to convert them to dollars.

    "Given the rise of the kyat, and depending on when they bought the FECs, many FEC holders might experience a considerable capital loss in kyat terms," Turnell said."

    Read full article "Myanmar Abolishes Dollar Surrogate"

  • Photo relating to Sean Turnell on the topic of slashing poverty in BurmaSean Turnell on the topic of slashing poverty in Burma

  • Publication: Arab News
    Title: Frustration foments in Yangon’s slums despite reforms
    Date: 11 December 2012

    Excerpt: "It is an “ambitious” goal, says Sean Turnell, an economist at Macquarie University in Sydney, backing Myanmar’s potential to achieve rapid growth and simultaneously reduce poverty.
    But that will only be possible with “a focus on agriculture” he says, calling for far-sighted policy to boost a sector which provides a living for the vast majority of Myanmar’s people. The government has been widely praised for major economic initiatives, including unifying multiple exchange rates, and enacting a foreign investment law."

    Read full article "Frustration foments in Yangon’s slums despite reforms"

  • Photo relating to Radio National - Sean TurnellRadio National - Sean Turnell
  • Sean talks about the need for economic reform in Burma on ABC Radio 
    • Media: ABC Radio National
    • Segment: Asia Pacific
    • Date: 16 October 2012


  • Photo relating to InFinance - Sean TurnellInFinance - Sean Turnell
  • Sean discusses the opportunities Asian markets are set to have on the Australian Banking Industry.
    • Publication: InFinance Magazine
    • Story: Capitalising on the Asian Opportunity
    • Issue: March 2012
  • Photo relating to Sydney Morning Herald - Sean Turnell Sydney Morning Herald - Sean Turnell
  • Sean discusses America's returning interest in Burma 
    • Publication: Sydney Morning Herald
    • Story: US scrambles back into Burma in a race for influence
    • Date: 6 February 2012
  • Photo relating to Australian - Sean Turnell Australian - Sean Turnell
  • Sean comments on the recent series of reforms that are underway in Burma and what that means for Western economic sanctions currently imposed on the country.
    • Publication: Australian
    • Story: Suu Kyi backs Burma reforms but says sanctions should stay
    • Date: 26 October 2011

    Read Sean's comments

  • Photo relating to LA Times - Sean Turnell  LA Times - Sean Turnell
  • Sean comments on Myanmar's decision to terminate the controversial Myitsone dam project
    • Publication: Los Angeles Times
    • Story: Myanmar calls surprise halt to controversial China-backed dam
    • Date: 1 October 2011

    Read Sean's comments

Editorial Boards

Sean currently serves on the editorial boards of Burma Economic Watch, the History of Economics Review and the Macquarie Economics Research Papers.

Referee

Sean has acted as a referee for The Cambridge Journal of Economics, the History of Economics Review, the Economic Record, the Australian Journal of Politics and History, Asian Survey and numerous other scholarly journals concerned with economics, economic history, and asian affairs. 

Publications

Publications and Conference Papers

  • ‘Myanmar in 2010’ 2011 (forthcoming), Asian Survey, vol.51, no.1.
  • ‘Fundamentals of Myanmar’s economy: A political economy approach’ 2011 (forthcoming), Asian Economic Policy Review,
  • (with Ha Thu Vu) 2010, ‘Cost efficiency of the banking sector in Vietnam: A Bayesian stochastic frontier approach with regulatory constraints’, Asian Economic Journal, vol.24, no.2, June, pp.115-139.
  • ‘Burma’s poverty of riches: Natural gas and the voracious state’, in L. Dittmer (ed) 2010,  Burma or Myanmar: The Struggle for National Identity, Singapore: World Scientific, pp.207-231.
  • ‘Recapitalizing Burma’s rural credit system’, in  N. Cheesman, M. Skidmore and T. Wilson (eds) 2010, Ruling Myanmar: From Cyclone Nargis to National Elections, Singapore” Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, pp.126-146.
  • ‘Finding dollars and sense: Burma’s economy in 2010’, in S.L. Levenstein (ed) 2010, Finding Dollars, Sense and Legitimacy in Burma, Washington DC: Woodrow Wilson Centre, pp.20-40.
  • Fiery Dragons: Banks, Moneylenders and Microfinance in Burma, 2009, Copenhagen: Nordic Institute of Asian Studies.
  • (with Leanne Ussher)  2009, 'A "New Bretton Woods": Kaldor, and the Antipodean Quest for Global Full Employment', Review of Political Economy, vol.21, 2009.
  •  (with Wylie Bradford and Alison Vicary) 2009 (forthcoming), ‘Burma’s Economy 2009: Disaster, Recovery…and Reform, Asian Politics and Policy, vol.1.
  •  ‘Microfinance in Burma’, in G. Goenka and D. Henley (eds) 2009 (forthcoming), From Moneylenders to Microfinance: Southeast Asia’s Credit Revolution, London: Routledge.
  •  ‘Burma’s economy 2008: Current situation and prospects for reform’, in A. Ahmed (ed), 2009, (forthcoming), Myanmar’s Economy, ICFAI (Institute of Chartered Financial Analysts of India) University Press: Bangalore
  •  ‘The Chettiars’, Bulletin of Burma Studies Group, 2009.
  •  ‘Burma’s Economy and the Sanctions Debate’, US House of Representatives, Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission Hearing, 23 April 2009.
  •  (with Wylie Bradford) ‘Paper Money in Burma: Creation, War, Reconstruction’, Paper Money in Theory and Practice in History Conference, Barnard College, Columbia University, New York, 17-19 April 2009.
  •  ‘Economic Development in Burma: Where to Now?’, Burma Review: Nation Building, Human Security, Sustainable Development, Civil Society and Peaceful Co-existance, Aichi Gakuin University, Nagoya, Japan, 13-15 March 2009.
  •  ‘Bridging the True “Financing Gap”: Effective Development Aid in Burma’, Burma Review: Nation Building, Human Security, Sustainable Development, Civil Society and Peaceful Co-existance, Aichi Gakuin University, Nagoya, Japan, 13-15 March 2009.
  •  'Burma’s Insatiable State’, Asian Survey, Vol.48, no.6 (November/December 2008).
  •  ‘The Roots of Unrest: Burma’s Economic Crisis’, in J. Ball (ed), 2008, Come Rain or Shine, Mizzima: Chiang Mai and New Delhi, pp.12-20.
  •  (with Alison Vicary) 2008, ‘Parching the Land’, Australian Economic History Review, vol.48, no.1, pp.1-25.
  •  (Review) ‘State Dominance in Myanmar: The Political Economy of Industrialization’, Tin Maung Maung Than, South East Asia Research, vol.16, no.3, November 2008.
  •  (with Wylie Bradford and Alison Vicary) 2008, ‘Migrant worker remittances and Burma’, in M. Skidmore and T. Wilson (eds), Dictatorship, Disorder and Decline in Myanmar, Canberra: ANU E-Press.
  •  ‘Economic aspects of Burma’s new Constitution’, International Burma Studies Conference, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Ill., 3-5 October 2008.
  •  (with Wylie Bradford) 2008, 'Burma’s economy 2008: Decline, Disaster…and Ways Forward', International Burma Studies Conference, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Ill, 3-5 October 2008.
  •  (Review) ‘Turmoil in Burma; Contested Legitimacies in Myanmar’, David Steinberg, Bijdragen tot de Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde (Journal of the Humanities and Social Sciences of Southeast Asia and Oceania), vol. 164, no.1, pp.150-152, 2008.
  •   (Review) ‘State Dominance in Myanmar: The Political Economy of Industrialization’, Tin Maung Maung Than, Bijdragen tot de Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde (Journal of the Humanities and Social Sciences of Southeast Asia and Oceania), 2008.
  •  ‘A wicked creeping’, SEAP Bulletin, Winter-Spring 2007-2008, pp.22-29.
  •  ‘Burma/Myanmar: The Four Crises’, Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University, Washington D.C., 23 April 2008.
  •  ‘Burma’s Economy: Current Situation and Prospects for Reform’, Office of the Coordinator for Reconstruction and Stabilization, US State Department, and The Bureau of Intelligence and Research, Arlington, Virginia, 24-25 March 2008.
  •  ‘The Crisis in Burma: In Search of a Unified Response’, The Asia Society, New York, in association with the Open Society Institute, 25 March 2008, New York.
  •  ‘Burma 2008, Genocide Risks, Triggers, and Pre-Crisis Interventions’, US Genocide Prevention Task Force, Pre-Crisis Engagement Group, US State Department/US Institute for Peace, 17 March, 2008, Washington D.C.
  •  ‘Overturning the Rice Bowl: Burma’s Long Road to Economic Privation’, Center for Southeast Asian Studies, University of California, Berkeley, 6 March 2008.
  •  ‘Burma Today’, review essay of Kyaw Yin Hlaing, Robert Taylor and Tin Maung Maung Than (eds), ‘Myanmar: Beyond Politics to Societal Imperatives’; Monique Skidmore (ed), ‘Burma at the Turn of the 21st Century’; Mya Than, Myanmar in ASEAN’, Bijdragen tot de Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde (Journal of the Humanities and Social Sciences of Southeast Asia and Oceania), Spring 2007, vol.163, no.1.
  • ‘Fiery Dragons: The Chettiars in Burma’, in B. Chaudhuri and S. Chadhuri (eds), IUAES Inter Congress on Mega Urbanization, Multi-Ethnic Society Human Rights and Development, Volume 2: Urbanization and Multi-Ethnic Society, New Delhi: SM Books 2007.
  • ‘Frank Lidgett McDougall’ in J.G. King (ed), A Biographical Dictionary of Australian and New Zealand Economists, Edward Elgar 2007.
  • ‘Sir Arthur Tange’ in J.G. King (ed), A Biographical Dictionary of Australian and New Zealand Economists, Edward Elgar 2007.
  • (Review) ‘Myanmar (Burma) since 1962: The Failure of Development’, Peter John Perry, Asian Studies Review, 2007 (forthcoming).
  • (Review) ‘Security and Sustainable Development in Myanmar’, Helen James, Asian-Pacific Economic Literature, vol.21, no.1, May 2007.
  • (Review) ‘Burma Today’, review essay of Kyaw Yin Hlaing, Robert Taylor and Tin Maung Maung Than (eds), ‘Myanmar: Beyond Politics to Societal Imperatives’; Monique Skidmore (ed), ‘Burma at the Turn of the 21st Century’; Mya Than, Myanmar in ASEAN’, Bijdragen tot de Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde (Journal of the Humanities and Social Sciences of Southeast Asia and Oceania), Spring 2007, vol.163, no.1.
  • ‘The Elastic Margin: Central Bank Theory and Practice in Colonial Burma’, History of Economic Thought Society of Australia Conference, University of Queensland, Brisbane, 11-13 July 2007.
  • ‘Behind the Teak Curtain: Prospects and Issues of the Burmese Economy’, School of Economics, Australian National University, 10 May 2007.
  • ‘Implications of Recent Economic Developments in Burma for Thailand’, Institute of Asian Studies/Burma Fund closed-door forum, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, 19 March 2007.
  • ‘Parching the Land: The Chettiars in Burma’, Asia-Pacific Economic and Business History Conference, University of Sydney, 12-14 February 2007.
  • ‘Burma’s Economic Dystopia’, Society of Heterodox Economics, University of New South Wales, 11-12 December 2006.
  • 'Burma's Economy 2006: An Overview', 2006 Myanmar/Burma Update Conference, Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, Singapore, 17 July 2006.
  • 'Fiery Dragons: Bankers and Banks in Burma', paper presented to the 2006 Burma Studies Conference, National University of Singapore, 13 July 2006.
  • 'Burma's Economic Prospects', Testimony before the United States Senate Foreign Relations Subcommittee on East Asian and Pacific Affairs, 29 March 2006.
  • 'Banks, Bankers and Burma: Continuing Issues', paper presented to the Asian Studies Program, Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University, 27 February 2006.
  • 'No checks, no balances: The Long and Sorry History of money and banking in Burma', paper presented to the Southeast Asia Program, Einaudi Centre, Cornell University, 16 February 2006.
  • 'Cooperative Credit in British Burma', in T. Frasch and S. Bhattacharya (eds), Merging the Unsuitable, Harrassowitz, Heidelburg, 2006 (forthcoming).
  • 'Burma's Economy 2004: Crisis Masking Stagnation', in T.Wilson (ed), Burma Update 2004, ISEAS, Singapore, 2005 (forthcoming).
  • 'Burma's Banking Crisis', in P. Warr and Zaw Oo (eds), The Burmese Economic Dilemma, Asia-Pacific Press, 2005 (forthcoming).
  • 'Behind the Teak Curtain: Authoritarianism, Agricultural Policies and Political Legitimacy in Rural Burma/Myanmar', by Ardeth Maung Thawnghmung, Asian-Pacific Economic Literature, vol.19, no.2, November 2005.
  • 'A Survey of Microfinance Institutions in Burma' Burma Economic Watch, no.1/2005, October 2005.
  • 'Microfinance in Burma', 'From Moneylenders to Microfinance, Southeast Asia's Credit Revolution in Institutional, Economic and Cultural Perspective, An Interdiscplinary Workshop, National University of Singapore, 7-8 October 2005.
  • 'Failed Hopes: Burma's Financial Sector', Seminar, Asia-Pacific Research Institute, National University of Singapore, 4 October 2005.
  • 'Burma's Economy', Seminar, Australian National University, 10 August 2005.
  • 'Burma's April Fools', The Irrawaddy, Vol.13, No.5, May 2005.
  • 'Finance in Burma: A Case Study in Methodological and Property Rights Failure', Eastern Economic Association, 31st Annual Conference, New York, 4-6 March 2005.
  • 'Suppose there was a Bank Crisis that Nobody Ever Heard of: Burma's Monetary Miasma', Seminar, Queens College, City University of New York, 28 February 2005.
  • (with G.C. Harcourt) 'Some Reflections on Keynes, Policy and the Second World War', in T. Aspromourgos and J. Lodewijks (eds), Peter Groenewegen Festschrift, Routledge, London, 2004.
  • 'Fiery Dragons? The Chettiars in Burma', International Union of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences Conference, University of Calcutta, India, 12-15 December 2004.
  • 'Burma's Economy 2004', Burma Update 2004, Australian National University, Canberra, 18-19 November 2004.
  • 'Cooperative Credit in British Burma', 18th European Conference on Modern South Asian Studies, Lund University, Sweden, 8 July 2004.
  • 'Burma's Banks and their Role in the Country's Humanitarian Crisis', Roundtable Seminar, Modern Asian Research Centre and Geneva Asia Society, Geneva, Switzerland, 28 June 2004.
  • 'Some Further Developments in Burma's Financial Sector', Burma Economic Watch, no.2 2004, pp.29-35.
  • 'Burma Bank Update', Burma Economic Watch, no.1 2004, pp.19-27.
  • 'Nugget Coombs: A Reforming Life', by Tim Rowse, The Journal of Economic History, vol.64, no.1, March 2004, pp.260-262.
  • 'Myanmar's Banking Crisis', Institute of Southeast Asian Studies (ISEAS), Singapore, 12 February 2004 (Seminar by invitation, ISEAS).
  • 'Myanmar's Banking Crisis', ASEAN Economic Bulletin, vol.20, No.3, December 2003, pp.272-282.
  • '50 Years a Keynesian and Other Essays', by Geoff Harcourt, The Economic Record, vol.79, no.246, September 2003, pp.388-390.
  • 'Keynes and War', Conference of the History of Economic Thought Society of Australia, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, 15-18 July 2003.
  • 'Burma's Banking Collapse', Myanmar/Burma Update Conference, Research School pf Pacific and Asian Studies, Australian National University, Canberra, 9 July 2003.
  • 'Burma's Economy under SLORC/SPDC', Faculty of Asian Studies Seminar, Australian National University, 11 April 2003 (Seminar and paper by invitation, Faculty of Asian Studies).
  • 'Burma's Banks', Burma Studies Roundtable, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, 7 February 2003.
  • 'Reforming the Banking System in Burma: A Survey of the Problems and Possibilities', Technical Advisory Network of Burma, Working Papers, no.7, November 2002.
  • 'Full Employment and Free Trade: An Historical Episode of Australian Intellectual Leadership', History of Economics Review, no.36, Summer 2002.
  • 'Reforming Burma's Banks', Burma Studies Conference, University of Gothenburg, Sweden, 21-25 September, 2002.
  • 'Core Labour Standards and the WTO', Economics and Labour Relations Review, vol.13, no.1, June 2002.
  • 'Keynes, Economics and War: A Liberal Dose of Realism', Journal of Conflict and Economics, vol.1, January 2002.
  • 'Australia's "Employment Approach" to International Post-war Reconstruction: Calling the Bluff of Multilateralism', Conference of the History of Economic Thought Society of Australia, University of Tasmania, 11-14 July 2001.
  • 'Free Trade and the WTO', Current Economics, vol.5, no.2, March/April 2000, pp.1-7.
  • 'F.L. McDougall: Éminence Grise of Australian Economic Diplomacy', Australian Economic History Review, vol.40, no.1, March 2000, pp.51-69.
  • 'The WTO, World Trade and Protection', Economics Literacy Centre Economics Conference, St. Joseph's College, 7-8 March 2000.
  • 'Monetary Reformers Abroad: Australian Economists at the Ottawa and World Economic Conferences', History of Economics Review, no.29, Winter 1999, pp.81-96.
  • 'Commonwealth and Cheap Money: Australian Economists at Ottwawa', Conference of the History of Economic Thought Society of Australia, University of Notre Dame Australia, Fremantle, 16-18 July 1997.
  • 'Australian Advocacy of Exapnsionary Economic Policies Internationally: The Nutrition Approach', Conference of the History of Economic Thought Society of Australia, University of Wollongon, 12-14 July 1993.